Kinder, More Gentle

Kinder, More Gentle

 

Several of you asked for the seven points I had listed in the sermon last week. Here they are:

So, taking  one small byte today, let’s begin this adventure with a commitment to be a kinder, gentler people showing forth the love of Christ. How about this:

  1. Think before you speak. Say things that build the person up and if directness is needed, couch it in kindness.
  2. We want excellence, but not at the expense of loving one another. Relationship is more important than perfection. 
  3. Let’s work together. Serve one another. Quit trying to boss people around and just get in there and serve.
  4. No Prima Donna’s. You are not the center of the universe. Give space and gentility to your brothers and sisters. We are all striving to do our best, but things happen to disrupt. Go with the flow. It will work out. Does it really mean that much? What is really important?
  5. Job One is to have a relationship with Jesus. Everyone in church should do their best to help themselves and others to experience the irresistible Jesus.
  6. Quit judging. If an immoral person comes to us (someone who is struggling with life and possible addictions), let’s receive them. If someone is different from us, receive them. Don’t impose your set of conducts on others who are just coming and learning. Youth will always be different in styles, language and some behaviors.
  7. Let’s be more family, support one another, love one another. 

When we look at church as an organization too firmly, we lose the human element in the process of trying to make everything work. We may have been assigned an area to serve in and develop, but it is the Lord’s first of all. Sometimes I have found people loose the joy of serving because they grab something and possess it to the exclusion of anyone helping or participating. I had to learn that as a parent. When a child wants to help bake cookies, the kitchen will be a mess and there will be no prize at the fair for best decorated cookie. When a boy mows the lawn for the first few times the rows will not be straight and it may look like the lawn got a mohawk haircut. What is important is they wanted to help. They are learning and criticism and complaint and anger will just make them never want to help again. This same thing happens with adults.

Like I said, this is a new day, a kinder day, a more loving and tolerant day with one another. Remember telling your little ones to “share.” Let’s share the journey together and serve one an other.

– Pastor Bill

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